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Old 06-08-2008, 10:04 AM   #1
mcfay
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Default Cherry tree

I'm in northeast Texas a little east of Dallas. I beleive it is zone 8A. Does anyone know if cherry trees will grow here? We love cherries but they are so expensive in the stores can't afford to buy them.
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Old 06-08-2008, 03:55 PM   #2
feldon30
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Dr Bob Randall, who has written a book on year round gardening in Houston and surrounding areas, states that sweet cherries do not do well here at all. There simply aren't enough chill hours. Certain varieties of tree need a certain number of chill hours (cumulative hours of temperature below 45 degrees) in order to enter and then properly break dormancy. Otherwise, the trees don't "wake up rested" and grow and fruit in the spring.
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Old 06-28-2008, 10:59 PM   #3
YorkerJenny
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If you REALLY want it, you can have cherry trees. If I was you, first, I would read everything I can find about cherries on the internet. Their varieties, climate zones, what kind of soil they need, how much humid, sun, shade, everything. Then I would try. There is a great website called davesgarden.com, you may find some articles what others are doing. I read an article over there, there was somebody who have tropical trees in cold zone, every winter she was digging and carrying inside, and in the spring move to outside again. I mean there are many technics that maybe you can never imagine. You have to accept in the begining that it will be not easy to grow as much as where it's native climate, but when you achieve, the satisfaction will be great. And don't listen if somebody laughs at you and says it doesn't grow here. It means nobody REALLY wanted that bad yet. And that person can be you, why not?
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Old 07-01-2008, 12:08 PM   #4
worth1
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It never fails to amaze me how the fine folks at the big box stores sell apple and cherry trees here in Texas.
Sometimes I will make it a point to stand next to them and let people know that they can NOT expect to get fruit from these trees and why.
I do know of some trees that give fruit (sometimes) in central Texas 70 miles north of Austin.

Where you live you will get fruit (sometimes in a cold year) maybe, but with the way winters are getting warmer, don’t expect much.

My dad used to drive across the Colorado River in the winter when it froze but that has been a LONG time ago. (1930’s - 40’s)

If you know of a person with a big walk in cooler that gets below 45 and not below freezing and you put a dwarf tree in it for about 40 days it will bear fruit.

That’s a long row to hoe to get cherries in the south.
We had apples and cherries in Ok and MO when I was a kid and it is the one reason I actually, as much as I hate to say it, HATE this place.
I miss my fruit trees and we had a lot of them.
Every year we had a room full of apples and cherries of all kinds.
Now all I can grow are loquats, pomegranates the Barbados cherry and a few other things I have yet to plant.

Barbados cherry,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acerola

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Old 07-11-2008, 10:20 AM   #5
flyarmyguns
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Thumbs up low-chill cherries

There are two relativly new introductions from Zeiger genetics. They are "Royal Lee" and "Minnie Royal" both are low-low-chill. Also, there is Lapins which has been known to fruit (quite heavily) in 200 hour areas regardless of what the tag at the store says.
I've heard of others as well, but these are a for sure.
Have you looked into Capulin? you may have to bad of a cold there...
There are also a slew of Eugenias that are cherry-like; Both the Grumichama, and Acerola are loved, as well as Suriname cherry, and Cherry of the Rio Grand. All are low or no chill and may do well there.
Possibly with some winter protection.
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Old 09-26-2010, 03:36 PM   #6
gstryder
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Well I am little bummed to read the answers on the Cherry Trees. I just got 2 trees and I live just north of Dallas too, in the city of Flower Mound. Hope that I get some fruit. According to the website they will grow in this zone. I also got an apple tree, hmmm we will see what happens.
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Old 09-26-2010, 07:46 PM   #7
blueadzuki
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Actually there are a few species of edible cherry that are native to places like California, and hence are able to grow in warmer climates. Two of the most common are the Ivy leaf cherry (Prunus ilicifolia) and the Capulin Cherry (Prunus salicicifolia). Trade winds fruit, on occasion carries seed of the Catalina Island Cherry (Prunus ilicifolia var. lyonii) (though not at the moment) if you have the patience to start a tree from seed.
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Old 09-29-2010, 02:42 AM   #8
feldon30
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North of Dallas, depending on the year, you may get enough chill hours to keep a cherry tree going. But I'd grow some fruit that are known to do well in Central Texas like certain peach varieties, blueberries, etc.
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Old 09-29-2010, 05:53 PM   #9
SeattleJohn
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Go talk to your local County Extension Office. If there are any varieties that produce in your area, they will know about them. Nursery trees are expensive, and you don't want to invest $$$ just to find out in three years that you will never realize any fruits. Get to know your Extension Agent...they are a great source of (free) local information! They are usually glad to see new people come in and ask questions.
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Old 10-26-2010, 12:36 PM   #10
BlackThumb
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Most of the cherries listed in Stark Bro's go to zone 7 but a couple 8 and one even 9. Worth a try.
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Old 06-23-2012, 05:11 AM   #11
Shirley60
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It will grow I live in Van Tx and there are several fruit trees here and apple also. Cherry trees do fruit in zone 8a that is what my zone is.
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Old 07-10-2012, 01:17 AM   #12
fliegenpilz
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I don't know anything about your climate and zones do not say much. Yes, it is always better to plant stuff that is suitable to the climate and then when there's still space left you can plant what is not so suitable. There are a lot of little known fruit that never makes it into the grocery store like mulberries, loquats, guavas feijoas etc. Cherry trees are not small and in many areas you need to net them or the birds will get all. If the climate is suitable I highly recommend acerola cherry, but a grafted named variety it bears in as little as one year and is very easy.
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Old 07-10-2012, 04:26 PM   #13
zebraman
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Bing Cherry grows well in zone 8A, but you should also plant the Black Tartarian or the Rainier for cross pollination. A 4 yr. old Bing can produce 30-50 quarts of fruit per season.
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Old 07-10-2012, 06:08 PM   #14
zebraman
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http://www.raintreenursery.com/Fruit...ime_Varieties/
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