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-   -   Dwarf Tomatoes (rugose foliage) (http://forums.seedsavers.org/showthread.php?t=2386)

333.okh 05-12-2010 03:36 PM

Dwarf Tomatoes (rugose foliage)
 
Not the 'giant tree tomato' a.k.a tamarillo.

I want to know more about types such as the:

Polish Dwarf
Russian Red
Dwarf Champion
Golden Dwarf Champion
Orange Tree
Aristobright

  1. What other types of these tree-types do you know of?
  2. What do you know about them?
  3. Are they good for areas with constant 20mph winds and more?
Some of the area I want to put tomatoes is wind all of the 'stinking' time so I want to look into a variety to grow that will withstand some of it rather than building screens.

carolyn137 05-12-2010 07:46 PM

If you go to Victory Seeds I think you'll find most of them described, with pictures.

I don't grow dwarfs so can't tell you how they'd do in high winds.

And an interesting note. At Tomatoville.com for the past several years there's been a wonderful dwarf project where many new dwarfs have been bred. The coordinator in the US is Craig LeHoullier and in Australia it's Patrina, so two crops can be grown each year.

Although I'm not part of the project I was sent 5 varieties to take a look at and I was very very pleased with what I grew out. Most are large fruited and I grew out a green when ripe, a gold and now I can't remember the others, but there are many different colors and shapes. Some of them should become commercially available at certain places maybe next year or the year after. It's taken a lot of dedication on the part of many folks to get them genetically stable and I think it's a wonderful contribution that these folks have made.

333.okh 05-12-2010 10:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by carolyn137 (Post 17483)
If you go to Victory Seeds I think you'll find most of them described, with pictures.

I don't grow dwarfs so can't tell you how they'd do in high winds.

And an interesting note. At Tomatoville.com for the past several years there's been a wonderful dwarf project where many new dwarfs have been bred. The coordinator in the US is Craig LeHoullier and in Australia it's Patrina, so two crops can be grown each year.

Although I'm not part of the project I was sent 5 varieties to take a look at and I was very very pleased with what I grew out. Most are large fruited and I grew out a green when ripe, a gold and now I can't remember the others, but there are many different colors and shapes. Some of them should become commercially available at certain places maybe next year or the year after. It's taken a lot of dedication on the part of many folks to get them genetically stable and I think it's a wonderful contribution that these folks have made.


This is very interesting to me. Most of my information came from SASE Tomato Seeds and Victory Seeds, as you mentioned. The project above sounds awesome. When I have tall plants I get them shredded at 5 feet max by winds. I cannot have fences or screens taller than 6 feet here by law, so I am looking at alternatives. This year is so wind, wet and cold, I want a new option. Russian tomatoes this year, but I will try an dwarfs next year to fill in for Russians that do not work out.

NOW I just need to start collecting seeds for next year.

Suze 05-13-2010 05:48 PM

I've found that the dwarf types w/rugose foliage tend to stand up better to wind. In addition, they do rather well in hot and dry conditions.

Also, they will usually be the last to show signs of foliar fungal disease in my garden in a dry year. In extremely humid or rainy conditions, the reverse seems to be true.

333.okh 05-13-2010 09:41 PM

all good information

elmtree3 05-19-2010 11:10 PM

Last year I grew a dwarf called "Utyonok." Seed I received from Andrey(BELR BA A) which I was pretty impressed with. It was probably no taller than one foot, had rugose leaves, was strong as an ox and produced more orange tomatoes than I thought possible from such a small plant. I also live in a very windy area, and there was no wind damage to the plants.

For my other plants, I cage them all(concrete wire mesh) and wrap them with a thin plastic to about 1 1/2' and when the plants get taller start putting small slits in the plastic to get them used to the wind, and eventually taking it all off. I've been doing this for a couple of years and it seems to work out pretty well. It's a lot of work when you have 50 or so cages to put up, but better than having them destroyed by the wind.

333.okh 05-21-2010 09:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by elmtree3 (Post 17623)
Last year I grew a dwarf called "Utyonok." Seed I received from Andrey(BELR BA A) which I was pretty impressed with. It was probably no taller than one foot, had rugose leaves, was strong as an ox and produced more orange tomatoes than I thought possible from such a small plant. I also live in a very windy area, and there was no wind damage to the plants.

For my other plants, I cage them all(concrete wire mesh) and wrap them with a thin plastic to about 1 1/2' and when the plants get taller start putting small slits in the plastic to get them used to the wind, and eventually taking it all off. I've been doing this for a couple of years and it seems to work out pretty well. It's a lot of work when you have 50 or so cages to put up, but better than having them destroyed by the wind.


I am getting some seeds...Some of which origin back to Andrey. The plastic method is a good idea. My Caspian and Tula tomatoes are getting hammered by wind, rain, and tonight hail!

carolyn137 05-22-2010 06:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by elmtree3 (Post 17623)
Last year I grew a dwarf called "Utyonok." Seed I received from Andrey(BELR BA A) which I was pretty impressed with. It was probably no taller than one foot, had rugose leaves, was strong as an ox and produced more orange tomatoes than I thought possible from such a small plant. I also live in a very windy area, and there was no wind damage to the plants.

For my other plants, I cage them all(concrete wire mesh) and wrap them with a thin plastic to about 1 1/2' and when the plants get taller start putting small slits in the plastic to get them used to the wind, and eventually taking it all off. I've been doing this for a couple of years and it seems to work out pretty well. It's a lot of work when you have 50 or so cages to put up, but better than having them destroyed by the wind.

Andrey lists it in the SSE Yearbook and I love the name as translated from the Russian language which is Little Duck.:) It's a Russian commercial variety from Sodek, which I think is a place where they breed tomatoes.

feldon30 05-23-2010 07:08 AM

I've renamed the thread from:
"Tree-Type" Tomatoes [dwarfs]
to
Dwarf Tomatoes (rugose foliage).


As you indicated, the list of Dwarf tomato varieties is just as short as the tomato plants themselves. Dwarf varieties grow 18-32" tall and have thick, rough rugose foliage. And only a few of them (New Big Dwarf in particular) are remarkable in flavor.


In 2005, a project was started to expand the number of Dwarf varieties by Craig LeHoullier and Patrina. Over 5 years, the Dwarf Tomato Project has overseen the growth of some 50 strains of tomato over 10 seasons straddling the the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Hundreds of people around the world have tested and selected the best tasting and most productive of these unique crosses, some of which have been grown now for 9 generations.

I'm really hopeful that this project is on the cusp of opening the floodgates and releasing a ton of dwarf varieties out into the hands of growers with limited space or other special gardening needs.

carolyn137 05-23-2010 01:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by feldon30 (Post 17687)
I've renamed the thread from:
"Tree-Type" Tomatoes [dwarfs]
to
Dwarf Tomatoes (rugose foliage).


As you indicated, the list of Dwarf tomato varieties is just as short as the tomato plants themselves. Dwarf varieties grow 18-32" tall and have thick, rough rugose foliage. And only a few of them (New Big Dwarf in particular) are remarkable in flavor.


In 2005, a project was started to expand the number of Dwarf varieties by Craig LeHoullier and Patrina. Over 5 years, the Dwarf Tomato Project has overseen the growth of some 50 strains of tomato over 10 seasons straddling the the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Hundreds of people around the world have tested and selected the best tasting and most productive of these unique crosses, some of which have been grown now for 9 generations.

I'm really hopeful that this project is on the cusp of opening the floodgates and releasing a ton of dwarf varieties out into the hands of growers with limited space or other special gardening needs.

Craig has sent certain of the varieties to three folks I know of, mainly to once again confirm genetic stability and also for lots of seed production.

One place already is a commercial place where tomato seed is sold and the other two are to a couple of SSE members. With bulk seeds to distribute I think the game plan is to send seeds to certain commercial places so that these varieties will be available to the public. But there's always room for a change of plans.;)

So hopefully we might see some listings for them at some places for the 2011 season, and there are many to follow in future years.

Got Worms? 05-27-2010 08:48 AM

I have four New Big Dwarf (I call them "Oxymoron") plants in five gallon containers, on my porch. They seem to be a quite stalwart, upstanding, and have weathered some twenty five to thirty five MPH (with higher gusting) winds so far. Time will tell.

I also have (right along side them) some Giant Belgiums and Chapmans; all faring equally well. :scratch:
Charlie


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