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When to grow carrots?

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  • When to grow carrots?

    When do you usually plant carrots? Should I grow them in the fall when it cools down a bit or can the be planted when it is hot? This is my first year gardening, so I have no experience with them!

  • #2
    Carrots are difficult to sprout. They require a long time to germinate, with a cool, damp soil. While carrot seeds are in the soil waiting to germinate, the soil must remain cool and moist. For this reason, they are usually sown in the spring.

    If Nature were to grow a carrot without the intervention of man, this is how it would work: (I have seen this happen numerous times in my own garden.) The seed head matures in the late fall. The seeds drop to the ground where they overwinter under the snow. They germinate on their own as the snows melt and the soil starts to warm up. I usually notice many volunteer carrot plants germinating by end of March/first of April.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by kellysgarden View Post
      If Nature were to grow a carrot without the intervention of man,
      She does. Have you ever seen wild carrots(queen ans lace). They look so similar to carrots and the root is exactly like a white carrot. It smell identical. Same flowers, similar leaves and growth cycle. I imagine it is the origin of the demestic carrot.

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      • #4
        I understand that carrots were originally white, but through breeding became different colors. Queen Anne's lace is the original carrot, if I understand correctly, but have also heard that Queen Anne's lace is poisonous. Not sure about that though.

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        • #5
          I think your right. I think that there were no orange carrots until some guy bred a orange strain for the queen of some European nation because the national color was orange. And it ironic that now the general person only knows orange carots.

          They are edible according to the books I read. You have too eat them in there first year of growth. After that they get woody just like second year carrots.
          Queen Anne's lace looks similar to plants like poison hemlock and there is always a warning in edible plants books along with it for this reason.

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          • #6
            Last year I planted my carrots in late spring....2 long rows. We dug up most of them by fall, but I left probably 50-100 in the ground over winter and we had an early thaw this spring. I remembered the carrots were still in the ground so I dug them up figuring to give them to the horses. They looked pretty good and solid, so I ate one......MAN! was that good! Sweetest carrot I'de ever eaten. Dug the rest up and ate fresh(frozen?)carrots in my lunch for the next eek until they were gone. I've heard of people leaving them in the ground and digging them up over the winter, but never took the time to do it, but I will from now on.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by MiakelMazz View Post
              I think your right. I think that there were no orange carrots until some guy bred a orange strain for the queen of some European nation because the national color was orange. And it ironic that now the general person only knows orange carrots.
              Well, I thought orange carrots first showed up in Afghanistan......

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              • #8
                Originally posted by groundcherry View Post
                Well, I thought orange carrots first showed up in Afghanistan......
                I was under the impression that the Dutch were responsible for the orange carrot.

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                • #9
                  Here's an interesting read: http://www.carrotmuseum.co.uk/history5.html

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                  • #10
                    In your zone I would try to plant some carrots NOW. They will mature in the fall and taste MUCH better than spring planted carrots. Heat makes them taste resinous but cold makes them sweet. The problem is of course getting them to germinate in the heat. If a cool rainy period is forecast, by all means take advantage, or be prepared to water every day until they germinate,probably a week or so. If you use drip irrigation, here is what works for me. I plant with my earthway seeder but hook up the chain so seeds are not covered. My clay is hard enough in the summer the little guys would have trouble breaking through any crust that formed. Then I lay drip tape right in the row and run it a couple hours every afternoon to keep the seeds cool and moist; they will germinate much faster than in the spring. I did not get any in this year, but would have liked to plant some in mid-june for late sept/october harvest. It has finally dried out here and I was just wondering if I could still get in a crop.

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                    • #11
                      I have been told that one easy way to keep the seeds wet is to cover them with a 2X4 down the row and water the top of the board,
                      it will keep the moisture in.
                      then keep checking and remove the board when they come up.
                      anyone here try that method ?

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