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  • High Production Tomato?

    Does anyone have suggestions for the most productive tomatoes? Prefer something less acidic than Mong or Marianna's Peace.

    Due to a slow economy we could all use a break with having a bountiful garden harvest this year

    Thanks,
    Amy

  • #2
    Originally posted by PA_CA_A View Post
    Does anyone have suggestions for the most productive tomatoes? Prefer something less acidic than Mong or Marianna's Peace.

    Due to a slow economy we could all use a break with having a bountiful garden harvest this year

    Thanks,
    Amy
    Green Giant gave me plenty, but it is very late to produce. Needs a long season.

    dcarch

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by PA_CA_A View Post
      Does anyone have suggestions for the most productive tomatoes? Prefer something less acidic than Mong or Marianna's Peace.

      Due to a slow economy we could all use a break with having a bountiful garden harvest this year

      Thanks,
      Amy
      Amy, when you say productive do you mean numbers of fruits or total poundage?.

      And what kind of varieties are you looking for in terms of your own use for them, and then indeterminate or det, short mid or long season, leaf form (if that matters to you), fruit color and size and shape.

      I'm asking questions b'c some see total fruits as being most productive and say the record was 2,467 off one cherry tomato plant (I made that up) versus growing a great tasting variety that has much larger but less fruits.

      You said you'd like varieties that were less acid (I'd say less aggressive or strong tasting) than Mong or Marianna's Peace. I haven't grown Mong, but I have MP and don't find it strong tasting at all.

      And there's the rub since taste is both personal and subjective so not everyone experiences the same taste, even with the same variety. And there are other factors that impact taste as well having to do with type of soil, amendments used, weather in any one season, etc. so it's really hard to say grow this or that variety to someone else, but we all do it anyway.

      IN PA you can grow any variety you want to and it will do well in a good year. And I know you don't want what some would call bland tasting tomatoes, so how about a middle ground here and with a bit more input from you folks will have a better idea of what to suggest.

      Comment


      • #4
        I guess that I was a bit vague. I am not looking for small or cherry varieties. I am looking for medium to large varieties that give many fruits that the plants are just "loaded" with fruit. I love having all different flavors of tomatoes all different colors and the uniqueness. I have been sacrificing volume for taste.

        I was wondering which tomatoes overall have been "bountiful producers" that are medium to large beefsteak. Marianna's Peace gave me many fruit and all consistently 1lb. but the flavor just did not appeal to me or my husband. I think we are spoiled with flavor by all the black, white, and yellow tomatoes that we grow. Pineapple is another one that I grow here in PA that gives me a reasonable amount of tomatoes with good flavor.

        The last couple of years, we have not had "bountiful tomatoes". Is this due to the global loss of bees? Do we now have to put more efforts into hand pollinating?

        Any suggestions greatly appreciated. I love tomatoes and am looking forward to eating some. I ordered some from the "best tasting" post. I just hope to find something new with good flavor and enough tomatoes so that I can make enough tomato basil salad to keep hubby happy!

        Thanks for your input
        ~Amy

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Amy,

          As another junior member, but long time tomato grower and lover I dare an answer. I as well all the time have sacrificed productivity to taste. I could afford this, cause I have place for lots of plants. But last year was horrible, most of my plants were ill and others produced few. So I plan for this year as well with the eye on productivity.

          Instead of pineapple I take f.ex. Mr. Stripey and Big Rainbow. Instead of MP there will be Stump of the World. Sure I will take again Anna Russian, Reif Red Heart and German Red Strawberry (last year my best producer except of the Cherries, among them the best producers are always Black Cherry and Japonaise Haute). Among the dark ones there will be again Black from Tula (though middle productive, but great in taste) and Reinhards Black Zebra, which is a productive and good selection from Dawsons B.Z.

          But whatever we plan and do, it will be nothing, if the circumstances won't help. Somehow like with the economy, isn't it? So let's hope that this will be a good year for both economy and tomatoes (as for tomatoes I think one can have hope, at the other thing it should be a miracle).

          Best Regards from Germany
          Eberhard

          Comment


          • #6
            I'd suggest Orange Banana which is a paste but is juicy and has such good flavor that we ate it on sandwiches and salads too. It grew huge vines and we picked ripe tomatoes constantly. They are also pretty large for a paste. As far as beefsteak type tomatoes our heaviest producer was an Emerald Evergreen but we only had one plant so I'm not sure if the productivity was representative or not. Black Plum was also a heavy heavy producer but not the best for fresh eating and then there is always Yellow Pear (which I know is a cherry), but it's low acid and so productive we can never keep up with picking Yellow Pear!

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            • #7
              I should also say that the Emerald Evergreen is great tasting.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by PA_CA_A View Post
                The last couple of years, we have not had "bountiful tomatoes". Is this due to the global loss of bees? Do we now have to put more efforts into hand pollinating?
                ~Amy
                Silly question but are you planting your tomatoes in the same place year after year? They can really deplete soil and there is always the risk of disease when planted in the same place year after year. If you are moving them to a new site they might give you "bountiful tomatoes" once again.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I don't profess to be any expert at all when it comes to the taste of tomatoes. Everyone has their own tastes. However, I have two suggestions that I have direct experience with as far as heavy production.

                  My Tidling Bush tomatoes are a small tomato, but produce total poundage that exceeds all others I grow. Tidling Bush comes on extremely early, and perhaps this is why total poundage is so high - - long total production time.

                  I also keep Campbell's 1327. This is my favorite tomato for an all-around producer. Large fruits and they bear heavily. That's probably why Campbell's used them for their tomato soups at one point in their history. But, Campbell's 1327 comes on a bit later in the season than my others, but they're worth waiting for. When they do come on, they bear really heavily. It's just that they are cut short in their production by my early fall frosts. Campbell's 1327 is a good, all-around tomato for taste, slicing and canning.

                  Just my $0.02 contribution for what it's worth.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    This is exciting, I have some of the tomatoes mentioned.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by PA_CA_A View Post
                      The last couple of years, we have not had "bountiful tomatoes". Is this due to the global loss of bees? Do we now have to put more efforts into hand pollinating?
                      Are you planting early enough?

                      Insect pollination is a bad thing if you are trying to save seeds from your tomatoes, just FYI. You want wind pollination or insects which do not readily drag pollen from one flower to the next.

                      I go around every few days with an electric toothbrush and touch flower clusters. With 30 plants it takes about 10-15 minutes and I've been reasonably happy with the productivity as long as I did everything right (healthy plants, good soil amendments, fertilization balanced for tomatoes, consistent watering, etc.).

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thank you all for your responses! You have given me many ideas as well as new varieties to try!

                        I do rotate my garden crops, however I am due to fertilize again. I am planning to test my soil again this year.

                        I am wondering though how many of you are hand pollinating vs. letting nature happen?

                        Planting early? In this area, May 4th is our "last frost", however we have had frosts end as early as April and as late as Memorial Day. I start planting May 1 with some varieties and hold some back, then I continue to plant all the way to the beginning of June.

                        Honestly, I am very excited about the varieties suggested! And I am also curious of the techniques used to obtain more fruits. I also noted that if at first you do not succeed with a variety, you try it again, then you order from another source. This was great information!

                        Thank you!!!! ~Amy

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Riesentraube

                          I plant a garden in an historic site and the family we interpret was very interested in production. Riesentraube is a German variety via Pennsylvania Dutch and translates to "abundant bunches of grapes". (Do you know it Eberhard?) Last year despite flood and wind damage it was very abundant. This year I will give it more support though. It is a cherry but it's a large one and is abundant in weight and volume. Funny story on origins of varieties: We grow a Belgian white carrot and had a visitor from Belgium who of course said he had never heard of either a white or a Belgian carrot.
                          Blackberry

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                          • #14
                            Rhoades Heirloom
                            Isis Brandy
                            JD's Special C-Tex
                            Spudakee Purple (PL Cherokee Purple)
                            Ludmilla's Red Plum
                            German Head
                            Oleyar's German

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              All the caveats apply (weather, location, year, etc.) but here is the production numbers I have compiled in the last ten years since I have become anal about records keeping:

                              The most weight for a single plant was Kelloggs Breakfast grown when I lived in central Iowa in 2002. 60 tomatoes weighing 87 pounds.

                              That same year and place a Russian 117 produced 125 tomatoes for 56 lb.

                              Since then both in Iowa and now in Nebraska these are the top producers with fruit numbers first and total weight next all as single plant production.

                              Omar's Lebanese 27/29
                              Marianna's Peace 44/32
                              Neves Azorean Red 64/50
                              Crnkovic Yugoslavian 66/47
                              Cuostralee 49/40
                              Marianna's Peace 52/31
                              Brandywine(Sudduth) 49/35
                              KBX 44/29
                              Butter and Bulls Heart 59/40
                              Brad's Black Heart 67/34
                              Kosovo 57/39
                              Nicky Crain 56/39
                              Carbon 60/34

                              I cage my plants and just let them go. What I get is what I get. My seed sources are fairly limited (SSE, Sand Hill, Marianna's, SSE members) and I have had no problems with seeds, only my own growing practices.

                              I start seeds the first week of March and plant outside the first or second week of May depending on the weather. All the above I feel have excellent flavor and are easy to grow.

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