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Can I plant a culinary and medicinal herbs together?

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  • Can I plant a culinary and medicinal herbs together?

    If so what would be good for a first timer?

  • #2
    Definitely...in many cases, they overlap. Here is what I would recommend for a starter herb garden, just off the top of my head.

    Culinary: thyme, chives, rosemary, oregano, sage, Italian parsley

    Medicinal: comfrey, yarrow, valerian, marshmallow, calendula, chamomile, echinacea

    Both: peppermint, spearmint, lemon balm...these are great for teas but can be aggressive spreaders, so I grow mine in large pots.

    There are also many medicinal and culinary herbs that can be foraged and that are prolific in the Midwest, such as mullein, elderflower, elder berries, chicory, stinging nettle, etc. My recommendation would be to do very careful research into the topic and purchase a good reference book or two, such as the physicians desk reference for herbal medicine. This is especially crucial if you forage.

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    • #3
      Definitely peppermint is the best option amongst them. So just take care what season is good for a particular one among the choices.

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      • #4
        Somehow it's fine just be picky and be specific on what you are going to plant. Some plants don't go really well.

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        • #5
          IMHO, if any of your medicinal plants shouldn't be eaten, then it might be best that they be planted off in their own garden. Just so they don't get harvested with the edibles by mistake. Otherwise, they can mix and match as suitable for the plant types.

          For culinary herbs, planting them close to the food prep area is good. That way when you want a bit of basil for the spaghetti sauce, it's much more likely you'll be able to pop out the door and get some. Also a lot of the culinary herbs grow well in pots so they can be brought in when it gets cold. If you had a kitchen window garden, that would be a great spot to grow culinary herbs.

          Also, plant what you like to eat and use. It's no use growing it if you aren't going to use it.

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